Shikha Nangia

Degrees:

  • Ph. D. Chemistry (2006) University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
  • M.Sc. Chemistry (2000) Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi, India
  • B.Sc. Chemistry (1998) University of Delhi, Delhi, India

Lab/Center Affiliation:

  • Syracuse Biomaterials Institute

Research interests:

  • Blood-brain barrier
  • Targeted cancer drug delivery
  • Multiscale modeling of nanomaterials
  • Nanomedicine
  • Virus nanotechnology

Current Research:

My research group focuses on studying blood-brain barrier using theoretical and computational techniques. The goal is to enable the transport of drug molecules across the blood-brain barrier, which has been the biggest impediment for finding a cure for brain related ailments such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. This project was funded through the NSF-CAREER award.

Additionally, we our group focuses on computational multiscale modeling of nanomaterials, including nanomedicine, drug delivery nanocarriers, and nano-bio interactions. The goal of this research is to design efficient nanosized drug delivery carriers to target cancer tumor cells that hold the key to a new era of cancer treatment. To achieve our research goals we are developing quantitative approaches for characterizing interaction of nanoscale entities with living matter (serum, cell-membranes, cells). Our computational approaches are directed to analyze these complex nano-bio interactions in an effort to design safe and smart drug delivery nanocarriers.

Courses Taught:

  • Statistical thermodynamics
  • Multiscale computational methods
  • Reaction kinetics

Honors:

  • NSF CAREER award (2015)
  • Faculty Excellence Award, College of Engineering and Computer Science, Syracuse University (2015)

Recent Publications:

Signaling factor interactions with polysaccharide aggregates of bacterial biofilms, S. C. DeSalvo, Y. Liu, G. Choudhary, D. Ren, S. Nangia, and R. Sureshkumar, Langmuir, 31 1958-1966 (2015). http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/la504721b

Multiscale approach to investigate self-assembly of telodendrimer based nanocarriers for anticancer drug-delivery, W. Jiang, J. Luo, and S. Nangia, Langmuir, 31 4270-4280 (2015). http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/la503949b

Optical signature of formation of protein corona in the firefly luciferase-CdSe quantum dot complex, J.M. Elward, F.J. Irudayanathan, S. Nangia, and A. Chakraborty, Journal of Chemical Theory and Computation, 10, 5534-5524 (2014). Featured on the cover. http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ct500681m

A Structure-Property Relationship Study of the Well-Defined Telodendrimers to Improve Hemocompatibility of Nanocarriers for Anticancer Drug Delivery, C.Shi, D.i Yuan, S. Nangia, G. Xu, K. S. Lam, and J. Luo, Langmuir, 30, 6878-6888 (2014). http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/la5003513

Effect of nanoparticle charge and shape anisotropy on translocation through cell membranes, S. Nangia and R. Sureshkumar, Langmuir, 28, 17666-17671 (2012). Featured on the cover. http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/la303449d