Carbon Co-Benefits Research

Figure_11aThe U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is released the nation’s first-ever carbon pollution standards for existing power plants on June 2, 2014. Syracuse and Harvard Universities teamed up to analyze how carbon pollution standards for existing power plants will decrease the emission of several co-pollutants, improve local air quality, decrease atmospheric deposition, and benefit people and ecosystems across the U.S.

Part I of the Study

Led by Professor Charles Driscoll, Part I was released on Tuesday, May 27. 2014 followed by a webinar and conference call for journalists. For details about the webinar, see the Media Advisory.

  • Press release - New Study Finds Strong Carbon Pollution Standards Improve Air Quality, Environment, and Health
  • Research Study - Co-benefits of Carbon Standards: Air Pollution Changes under Different 111d Options for Existing Power Plants
  • Powerpoint slides from conference call for journalists on Tuesday, May 27th

Links to Hi-Resolution Maps from Study

  • Figure 6a: Projected changes in total annual sulfur deposition under Scenario #1 in 2020 (kilograms per hectare-year)
  • Figure 6b: Projected changes in average annual PM2.5 from the Reference Case under Scenario #1 in 2020 (micro-grams per cubic meter)
  • Figure 7a & Figure 7b: Average annual PM2.5 in 2020 for the Reference Case and change from this condition in Scenario #2 (micro-grams per cubic meter)
  • Figure 8a & Figure 8b: Average summer (June 1 – August 31) peak 8-hr ozone for Reference Case and change in this condition for Scenario #2 (parts per billion)
  • Figure 9a & Figure 9b: Average annual peak 8-hr ozone for Reference Case and change in this condition for Scenario #2 (parts per billion)
  • Figure 10a & Figure 10b: Total annual sulfur deposition in 2020 for Reference Case and change in this condition for Scenario #2 (kilograms S per hectare-year)
  • Figure 11a & Figure 11b: Total annual nitrogen deposition for Reference Case and change in this condition for Scenario #2 (kilograms N per hectare-year)